That which is to come

Faces rise through the soil, ghostly apparitions of life once buried yet clawing its way to the surface.

They call themselves flowers, these earthly beings, these shining, petaled, hued portraits of aliens.

A spotted cucumber beetle (Diabrotica undecimpunctata) makes its ascent over the petals of a common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) (20080301_02425)

They open without a sound, yet other marvelous creatures hear their siren songs and rush to partake of the bountiful visage each proffers.

More than was lost the year before is found again with each blossom, each new life.

A close-up of several crowpoison (a.k.a. crow poison or false garlic; Nothoscordum bivalve) flowers (20080301_02394_p)

Soon their armies will march upon the mountains and plot upon the plains.

Soon their kind will take from the sun all that it fells upon the world, and in that taking they will give as much as they consume.

A western honey bee (a.k.a. European honey bee; Apis mellifera) dives to the heart of a showy evening primrose (Oenothera speciosa) to fetch a bit of pollen (20080412_03273)

Lives will do battle with those risen from the ground, will eat of their flesh, and in doing so will give hope to more faces that will glow in generations to come.

What splendor does war in the vernal birth of our planet!  What marvels do manifest!

Western salsify (Tragopogon dubius) blooms and stalks reaching toward the sky (20080426_04675)

Towers will be built.  Traps will be set.  And more faces will rise than can be counted.

We will watch this, we humans, and we will wonder at the beauty of such beasts.

A western honey bee (a.k.a. European honey bee; Apis mellifera) resting atop a full bloom of wild carrot (a.k.a. bishop’s lace or Queen Anne’s lace; Daucus carota) (20080518_05549)

Even as we shrink away from the heat that besets the selves we wish to protect, dirt will crumble as more leviathans reach forth, climb the air above, strip away their winter skins for spring countenances too long hidden away.

Fields will be colored by them.  Winds will carry their essence.  Eyes will rest upon their forms like so many mouths upon a banquet.

A syrphid fly (a.k.a hover fly; Toxomerus marginatus) feeding on the pollen of a Texas dandelion (a.k.a. false dandelion, Carolina desert-chicory, leafy false dandelion or Florida dandelion; Pyrrhopappus carolinianus) (20080518_05376)

What hope have we in light of such unstoppable invasions?

All hope, for vernal is that which is to come: life from lifelessness, growth from dormancy, brilliance from mundane, and new faces from the ashes of those who came before.

— — — — — — — — — —

Mary offered It’s Time for February Eye Candy and David offered Happy first day of spring!, both posting on the same day no less, and I blame them for this sudden want of mine to see the verdant, abundant life of spring.  Not that I don’t like winter, mind you; I love it, in fact, as it’s my favorite season, yet the naturalist within me desires the overflowing bouquet of marvelous flora and fauna that defines where we go from here.

Photos:

[1] A spotted cucumber beetle (Diabrotica undecimpunctata) makes its ascent over the petals of a common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale).

[2] As toxic as it is beautiful: crowpoison (a.k.a. crow poison or false garlic; Nothoscordum bivalve).

[3] A western honey bee (a.k.a. European honey bee; Apis mellifera) dives to the heart of a showy evening primrose (Oenothera speciosa) to fetch a bit of pollen.

[4] A non-native species considered invasive in many parts, western salsify (Tragopogon dubius) produces large, elegant flowers.  All the towering buds you see around it are of the same species.

[5] A western honey bee (a.k.a. European honey bee; Apis mellifera) resting atop a full bloom of wild carrot (a.k.a. bishop’s lace or Queen Anne’s lace; Daucus carota).  Behind both towers yet another flower of the same plant has yet to open.

[6] A syrphid fly (a.k.a hover fly; Toxomerus marginatus) feeding on the pollen of a Texas dandelion (a.k.a. false dandelion, Carolina desert-chicory, leafy false dandelion or Florida dandelion; Pyrrhopappus carolinianus).

5 thoughts on “That which is to come”

  1. The math is getting more difficult. I’m not sure I can withstand the pressure.

    Soooo, here we go again with the insects, eh?

    How about horses? Or goats for a change? The photos are really nice but I’m experiencing difficulties feeling love for your insectious subjects. Their personality is not shining through.

  2. LOL! You’ve mentioned the math before, dearest nathalie. I’ll see what I can do to make 9+9 easier for the numerically challenged.

    I can’t help it with the insects. I love them! They fascinate me so…

  3. Almost a month later, I’m looking at a new fallen snow from my window, and found this. Your eye candy is so much more eloquently put than mine. Gee, Jason. It’s wonderful.

    Have you visited "Nature Remains" on my blogroll? I think you and Nina have the best way with words.

  4. Wow–the images you leave me with are wonderful–both visually and painted with your words.

    These first images of spring are most welcome, the forces felt as they rise all around.

    (Mary stopped by and left a note forwarding me to visit, and I’m glad she did!)
    You’ll find I have 5 cats to your 7–also loved members of my family! 🙂

  5. Thank you, Mary and Nina, for your kind compliments! I’m glad these brought you some warmth–especially in the midst of your winter invasion, Mary. What a time to find a bit of spring, even if only digital.

    And I appreciate you taking the time to stop by and comment, Nina. Five cats, huh? What a warm and inviting home you must have…

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