For some, six legs too many

Clinging to an old pipe in the dim light of dawn, for some she has six legs too many.

A female crab spider (Mecaphesa dubia) clinging to an old pipe (IMG_1168)

Protecting her egg sac atop a blade of grass, for some she has six legs too many.

A female western lynx spider (Oxyopes scalaris) protecting her egg sac atop a blade of grass (IMG_2152)

Camouflaged in a sandy clearing and surveying for potential prey, for some she has six legs too many.

Close-up of a female wolf spider (Hogna antelucana) (IMG_3511_c)
A female wolf spider (Hogna antelucana) standing in a sandy clearing (IMG_3511)

Skulking in grass and hay in the wee hours of the morning, for some he has six legs too many.

A male rabid wolf spider (Rabidosa rabida) lurking in sparse grass (IMG_0159)
A male rabid wolf spider (Rabidosa rabida) walking through grass (IMG_0164)
A male rabid wolf spider (Rabidosa rabida) approaching atop scattered hay (IMG_0186)
A male rabid wolf spider (Rabidosa rabida) seen from above (IMG_0138)

For some, six legs too many.  For me, legs enough to be captivating.

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Photos:
(1) Female crab spider (Mecaphesa dubia)
(2) Female western lynx spider (Oxyopes scalaris)
(3) – (4) Female wolf spider (Hogna antelucana)
(5) – (8) Male rabid wolf spider (Rabidosa rabida)

3 thoughts on “For some, six legs too many”

  1. I’ve always had a soft spot for spiders, and I’m forever ferrying them around the house to places where they’ll be less likely to be trodden on. (Though it’s probably not doing them any favour because they invariably return.) The bath is always a source of ongoing drama, with spiders emerging from the outlet to set up camp. I’ve had up to six in there at any one time, all quite different and all circling each other with an eye to a meal. Different hunting techniques too, from lightning-strike pounces to lassoing. Occasionally a clear-out is required… a guest requiring a bath or the tub needing a wash… but it’s not long before the spiders return, and the drama continues.

    Wonderful photographs here, Jason. The ‘Male Rabid Wolf Spider’ sounds a handful. Why that name? Does the bite produce rabies-like symptoms, or does the spider itself have a behaviour reminiscent of rabies sufferers? He sounds to be avoided!

  2. Jason! It’s been way too long, much too long! Hi there stranger and how are you?? Love your spider macros, i’ve always kinda liked those wolfie guys 🙂

  3. I like all these photos, but the crab spider fascinates me. Since I’m so used to skeletons being on the inside of us her legs appear as fake, maybe even made of clear plastic. Nature is so grand!

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